Postgraduate Modules

Please see below all Postgraduate Modules we have on offer at Regents Theological College. Each module has a short description and shows the tutorial and assessment dates.

Post Graduate Modules
  • The module includes an exploration of the theories and processes of organisation that relate to the leading and managing of an enterprise within a Christian faith context, with particular emphasis on strategic organisational improvement. This also entails an exploration and critique of various contemporary models of leadership, analysing the alleged differences between leadership and management. A biblical-theological perspective is maintained throughout as leadership principles are appraised for their suitability within Christian missional leadership. Theoretical underpinnings are scrutinised and the challenges implicit in relying upon them examined in one’s consequent implementation, leading and management of an organisation. Themes include: time management; handling meetings; stress management; conflict avoidance and resolution; motivating staff; staff recruitment and appraisal; and decision-making processes. Matters related to strategic planning and development are identified and explored, such as: leadership strategies; information gathering; decision-making processes; negotiation; analytical and evaluative skills in leadership; and the place of mission at the heart of Christian strategy.

    Programmes: MA & MTh

    Lecture Dates: TBD
    Assessment Dates: TBD

  • The module addresses three major areas related to the exercise of Christian leadership. Firstly, it explores a range of challenges encountered in developing a theologically informed vision for leading in a Christian organisation. Secondly, the module explores various models for value-driven Christian leadership and encourages critical self-reflection upon the current practice of participants in positions of Christian leadership. The interrelation between models of Christian leadership and a leader’s prioritisation of their various activities will also be examined. Finally, a range of strategies for the practice of developing a culture of effective disciple making within church contexts are critically analysed, with a particular focus on strategies for developing both leaders themselves and theologies of leadership.

    Programmes: MA & MTh

    Lecture Dates: TBD
    Assessment Dates: TBD

  • All chaplaincy work is conducted on the margins between the society of faith and in the context of the secular. This module will introduce the learner to the secular, with its concepts of establishment, the public square, and religious freedom, as well as the tensions that exist between faith practice and the degree to which the UK operates as a secular society. The module analyses the institutional characteristics found in the context of prison, military, and healthcare chaplaincy and critically evaluates a range of established models of ministry in order to enable chaplains to engage effectively in those settings. Approaches to the application of diversity practice in the workplace will be used as an illustrative example to help learners develop critical skills for reflecting upon institutional norms and how these may impinge upon theological understandings of difference. As part of their critical self-reflection participants will develop advanced understanding and application of at least one protected characteristic as described in the Equality Act (2010).

    Programmes: MA & MTh

    Lecture Dates: TBD
    Assessment Dates: TBD

  • The module consists of an initial historical analysis of some major models of Christian “mission” thinking and practice, from the Day of Pentecost until the present. These will be analysed within their own historical, theological and social context in order to identify indications for a present-day practice that is both relevant and self-critical. Major trends and developments within Western missiology from Edinburgh 1910 until Edinburgh 2010 will be analysed and critiqued, and a number of case studies from this century will be investigated. The notion of “full-circle” mission, particularly in the context of the massive growth in Pentecostal-charismatic-evangelical groups in the Global South, will be critically investigated and new models for Western mission practice considered in view of this. The present-day missions strategies of Christian denominations and of independent “missions” groups such as OM will be compared and the challenges of communicating the Christian message in those parts of the 10/40 window that are still relatively untouched by Christianity identified. Strategies for conducting Christian mission in such regions will be creatively developed in critical dialogue with existing models.

    Programmes: MA & MTh

    Lecture Dates: TBD
    Assessment Dates: TBD

  • The 15,000 word dissertation provides an opportunity to investigate a selected aspect of Christian theology and its application in the context of Christian ministry or practice. The relevant fields of study include exegetical, theological, socio-ethical, pastoral, missiological and/or historical issues. The dissertation proposal must conform to the programme aims and learning outcomes, whilst also reflecting the student’s personal and/or professional interests. The dissertation is based upon guided, but largely independent, research.

    Programmes: MA

    Lecture Dates: TBD
    Assessment Dates: TBD

  • The 25,000 word dissertation provides an opportunity to investigate a chosen topic relevant to Biblical Studies or Pentecostal-Charismatic Studies. Prior to admission on to the research degree, a dissertation proposal that conforms to the programme aims and learning outcomes and reflects the student’s personal and/or professional interests will have been approved. Supervisors will have already been assigned to the student. The dissertation is based upon guided, but largely independent, research on the approved topic.

    Programmes: MRes

    Lecture Dates: TBD
    Assessment Dates: TBD

  • This module explores two critical hermeneutical problems fundamental to Christian interpretation of the Old Testament within a coherent biblical-theological framework. The theological section of the module critically evaluates recent attempts to coherently relate the biblical portrayals of YHWH, Jesus, and the Spirit, without distorting the distinctive witness of each Testament. The possibility of finding a rapprochement between approaches emphasising coherency and those emphasising development/ discontinuity in the biblical portrayal of God is explored. The ecclesiological section of the module offers an exegetical analysis of the relationship between Old Testament Israel and the New Testament Church. It critically evaluates the exegetical warrant for a number of models (for example, dispensationalism; covenantalism; progressive covenantalism) in dialogue with key biblical texts, including Romans 9-11, and seeks to develop innovative alternatives. The interrelationship of the theological and ecclesiological problems is explored and critical reflection on the implications of these biblical-theological investigations for Christian theology and practice is encouraged throughout.

    Programmes: MA & MTh

    Lecture Dates: TBD
    Assessment Dates: TBD

  • This module analyses Western forms of Pentecostal spirituality, taking into account historical, sociological, and theological perspectives. The development of a distinctively Pentecostal spirituality is explored from its inception in the early 20th century with attention paid to both its historical roots and its relation to later developments, such as the Charismatic Renewal movement. Practices associated with Pentecostal spirituality are phenomenologically and sociologically examined with reference to themes such as: glossolalia; healing; exorcism; “spiritual warfare”; sung worship; prayer; prophecy; use of Scripture. Both historical and current practices are subjected to critical theological evaluation. Contemporary challenges currently affecting Western Pentecostal spirituality are analysed, such as: the rise of trans-denominational hyper-charismatic movements; the relation between Charismatic leaders/apostles and the (ab)use of religious authority; the influence of the “prosperity Gospel”; the impact of the internet and social media on spiritual praxis; postmodern forms of religious belonging and identity.

    Programmes: MA & MTh

    Lecture Dates: TBD
    Assessment Dates: TBD

  • The module begins by surveying recent trends in Pentecostal Theology as found primarily in Western academic and ecclesial contexts. Subsequently, challenging issues currently facing Pentecostal Theology are explored in relation to three foci: Church, World, and Academy. The section on Church explores ecclesiology and ecumenism, offering a critical analysis of current Pentecostal models for ecclesiology with regard to both their internal coherency and their implications for ecumenical engagement. The contribution of Pentecostal theology to ecumenical dialogue is also explored. The section on World explores pluralism and politics, critically evaluating recent Pentecostal responses to the challenges of pluralism in the West, including: involvement in interreligious dialogue and the construction of theology of religions; responses to secularism within Pentecostal political theology. The final section Academy explores rationalities and education, critically evaluating Pentecostal responses to issues such as: the cultural predominance of scientific rationality; the natural sciences and Pentecostal apologetics; Pentecostal fundamentalism as a reaction to scientific modernity; humanism, the ideal of progress and the purpose(s) of education. Critical reflection on the significance of Pentecostal theology’s engagement in the public sphere for the Pentecostal movement in the West is encouraged throughout.

    Programmes: MA & MTh

    Lecture Dates: TBD
    Assessment Dates: TBD

  • Chaplaincy is a practical expression of Christian ministry carried out in a variety of secular settings. This module analyses elements common to many areas of Chaplaincy, such as: reflective pastoral practice; engaging with institutional aims; leading worship ecumenically; working in multi-faith teams. Participants also develop their ability to engage in critical reflection upon their own experience of chaplaincy in action, particularly in relation to themes such as: restorative justice; spirituality and healing; work as mission; Just War theory; holistic personal development. The context for reflection could be in any active chaplaincy, but most commonly would be in the fields of healthcare, education, the military, prison, or the workplace.

    Programmes: MA & MTh

    Lecture Dates: TBD
    Assessment Dates: TBD

  • This module explores Luke-Acts as a normative biblical text for Pentecostalism and seeks to identify ways in which the themes of Spirit and Salvation might shape, challenge, and extend current Pentecostal-Charismatic theology and praxis. A critical discussion of the author, structure, ethos and purpose of the text of Luke-Acts introduces the module. Subsequently, two major themes within Luke-Acts are explored by means of the socio-rhetorical method and other multidisciplinary perspectives, namely: Study of the term “Holy Spirit” and recognised synonyms within that text, with particular attention paid to the term “baptism in/with the Holy Spirit”; Exploration of the Lukan conception of salvation with attention also being paid to its holistic nature in terms of the role of physical healing and exorcism. The distinctiveness of the Lukan treatment of these themes is indicated via comparative analysis with selected NT texts, primarily Paul and the Synoptics. Exegetical findings inform critical theological reflection upon the significance of Luke-Acts for current Pentecostal-charismatic theology including its relevance and application to Christian ministry today. Themes for reflection may include: the nature of salvation; the doctrine of “Spirit-Baptism” and its associated debates; theologies of physical healing.

    Programmes: MA & MTh

    Lecture Dates: TBD
    Assessment Dates: TBD

  • The module provides an overview of the field of theology, orienting students to the demands of postgraduate study in theology. It offers a historical survey of key figures and concepts essential to the understanding of complex methodological issues within theology and critically evaluates a range of research methods currently being employed in the core theological disciplines (biblical, systematic, historical, practical) and their various sub-disciplines. A range of methodological problems are discussed, such as: the use of qualitative and quantitative research methods in practical theology and the ethical implications of such research; the deployment of historiographical models and their suitability for the theological task; the use of contemporary literary theories and recent hermeneutical and exegetical strategies for the reading of Scripture; the theological validity of different missiological models; types of Pentecostal theology. Current methodological and theological issues in the field of systematic theology are exemplified by means of detailed consideration of the work of at least one contemporary theologian. In terms of research skills, guidance is provided regarding the construction of a detailed literature review and the compilation of a proposal for a postgraduate level research project.

    Programmes: MA & MTh

    Lecture Dates: TBD
    Assessment Dates: TBD

  • The module will explore the theological, cultural and social changes that have arguably led to a sacred-secular divide in the experience of many individuals and church communities in the UK. The effects of this change on ministry development and local churches will be critically assessed. Creative and theologically robust alternatives to existing paradigms of church leadership and mission will be developed in dialogue with key biblical texts in relation to a range of themes, such as: transitioning between ‘heroic’ leadership patterns to ministry practices that support local cultural transformation; developing biblically grounded theologies of discipleship in relation to areas such as work, power, home, or citizenship. Critical reflection upon the impact of the sacred-secular paradigm on preaching, leading worship, spiritual direction, and administration encourages the development of innovative new models of pastoral practice.

    Programmes: MA & MTh

    Lecture Dates: TBD
    Assessment Dates: TBD